blue-voids:


Graham Dean - Close-Up Kiss, watercolor on paper, 1988

blue-voids:

Graham Dean - Close-Up Kiss, watercolor on paper, 1988

(via mountingwaveofsound)


humansofnewyork:

"There are many different tribal dialects spoken in Uganda.""What tribe did you descend from?""I’m half Alur, and half Lugbara. Both tribes settled along the West Nile in Uganda. The Alur are found in the Congo as well." "Can you tell me something The Alur are known for?""Our men are very brave. Though their egos could use a little work."

humansofnewyork:

"There are many different tribal dialects spoken in Uganda."
"What tribe did you descend from?"
"I’m half Alur, and half Lugbara. Both tribes settled along the West Nile in Uganda. The Alur are found in the Congo as well." 
"Can you tell me something The Alur are known for?"
"Our men are very brave. Though their egos could use a little work."



jfkwasacat:


mauridianhallow:

lambishwolf:

toptumbles:

This is called humanity


I have nothing to say on this, these people are the pinnacle of human compassion, and that is all there is to it.

Japan has an amazing sense of community and honor. 

jfkwasacat:

mauridianhallow:

lambishwolf:

toptumbles:

This is called humanity

I have nothing to say on this, these people are the pinnacle of human compassion, and that is all there is to it.

Japan has an amazing sense of community and honor. 

(via hugs4me4you4all)



Inside a war on natural birth: c-sections as status symbol and 'choice' as a myth

odditiesoflife:

The Mysterious Rediscovery of Ocean Jasper

Ocean jasper is such a unique stone, its found in only one place in the world — a small site along the northwest coast of the island of Madagascar. Ocean jasper is a variety of orbicular jasper, a type of jasper named for the spherical shapes that pattern the stone. The term jasper comes from the Greek word, iaspis, meaning “spotted stone.” Various forms of this jasper can be found in many areas around the world, however the ocean jasper of Madagascar is unique due its beautiful colors and markings.

Another aspect that lends mystery to the stone is the story of how it was found, or actually “found again”. Ocean Jasper was first written about in 1922, but the location was lost for the next 75 years. All that was known was that it came from somewhere in Madagascar, and that the location of the quarry had been lost. In the 1950s, a sample specimen was brought to the Museum of Sciences in Paris, France. But with the sample came a mystery — no one knew where the source was located and Madagascar is a very large island (approximately 1,000 km long and 300 km wide).

The stone made its reappearance to the world at the 2000 Tucson Gem and Mineral Show, and the story behind its rediscovery was the talk of the crowd. After 45 days of tirelessly searching along the Madagascar coast, an exploration group from the mining company, Madagascar Minerals, located the ocean jasper deposit. The reason the site was lost for so long is that it is only visible at low tide.

sources 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

(via mountingwaveofsound)


sometimeskaren:


“Inside every burning leaf is the pattern of an older tree.” -Sting

sometimeskaren:

“Inside every burning leaf is the pattern of an older tree.” -Sting

(via mountingwaveofsound)


umafestapromeucancer:


eaí sussa

stuckinabucket:

Bats Pollinate Things, or You Can’t Echolocate With Your Head Stuffed Up A Flower

So, bat pollination: totally a thing.  Bats are actually terrifically important pollinators in desert and tropical environments, for, uh, roughly the same reason.  

See, the thing about tropical environments is that you look at them, as a human being, and you go “Aw, wow, look at all that biodiversity, it’s just like everything’s fucking alive man oh wow this is awesome there are five billion species per square inch!” But if you look at it from the individual five billion species per square inch’s point of view, or at least the ones that are plants, what it quite frequently means is that they’ve got a fucking long-ass way to go before they can find something to fertilize/be fertilized by.  A lot of those species are existing in very small niches, or at the outer edge of the ranges.  See also, plants in the desert.

Now, this means that you can’t just organize a jizz-based swap-meet like wind-pollinated plants or even bee-pollinated plants.  It’s just too much of a crap-shoot that your pollen will get where it needs to go.  And when you’ve got a million fucking miles to go before you can find a suitable genetic bro, you need something that flies a little bit farther and a little bit faster than just like, a butterfly or something.  So you need, say, a bird or a bat.

Enter, well, bats. (Birds pollinate stuff, too, but they usually don’t look so ridiculous doing it, so we’re slightly less concerned with them right now.)  Many bats, especially the bigger ones, are really just incredibly strong flyers, given their still quite-small size and weight.  Bat flowers typically open at night, have a strong scent, and are conspicuous both visually and by echolocation.  

The bat gets nectar out of it, and the plant gets pollinated.  Since bats tend to have very good navigational memories, a plant that manages to attract a bat’s attention once or twice can put out blossoms over a long period of time and expect frequent return trips on the bat’s part, increasing the likelihood that at least some of its pollen is getting where it needs to go and that at least some of the bat’s trips will bring other plants’ pollen to it.

(via botanicalperversion)


debutart:

Joe Wilson The Secret Garden Party

debutart:

Joe Wilson The Secret Garden Party


(Source: flowerling, via saturnrising)


throughmythirdeye:

Hayao Miyazaki animated rain, which means every frame is hand drawn. 

(via somepsychedelia)




1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Powered by Tumblr. Theme by hayleyrocktrix