throughmythirdeye:

Hayao Miyazaki animated rain, which means every frame is hand drawn. 

(via somepsychedelia)



cuteness-daily:

IT’S BACK 

(Source: tastefullyoffensive, via xtinascavo)


the-eyeball-fairy:

bad-moon-moon:

and-rohan-will-answer:

babies are naturally able to swim hello they just spent nine moths in amiotic fluid this is instinctive so no, parent is not shitty, parent is re-enforcing baby’s natural instinctive behaviour.

parent is good for doing this because parent is basically saying “yes the behaviours you were born with are great!”

Yup, if babies are ‘taught’ (allowed) to swim before they are six weeks old, they never lose the instincts they were born with that lets them hold their head above water and hold their breath when they need to. SCIENCE, man.

What’s really cool is, humans are the only primates known to have this instinct at birth. Other ape babies would just freak out and drown. So I don’t think it comes from being in amniotic fluid for 9 months (since it’s not like they have room to actually swim in there). It’s been speculated that humans evolved in the ocean at some point, which is a really cool theory that I recommend checking out.

Also, SWIMMING BABY IS ADORABLE.

(Source: derindengirenler, via xtinascavo)



chroniclesofamber:

Cyber-Dys-Punk-Topia

“There was a place near an airport, Kowloon, when Hong Kong wasn’t China, but there had been a mistake, a long time ago, and that place, very small, many people, it still belonged to China. So there was no law there. An outlaw place. And more and more people crowded in; they built it up, higher. No rules, just building, just people living. Police wouldn’t go there. Drugs and whores and gambling. But people living, too. Factories, restaurants. A city. No laws.

William Gibson, Idoru

It was the most densely populated place on Earth for most of the 20th century, where a room cost the equivalent of US$6 per month in high rise buildings that belonged to no country. In this urban enclave, “a historical accident”, law had no place. Drug dealers, pimps and prostitutes lived and worked alongside kindergartens, and residents walked the narrow alleys with umbrellas to shield themselves from the endless, constant dripping of makeshift water pipes above….

Kowloon ‘Walled’ City lost its wall during the Second World War when Japan invaded and razed the walls for materials to expand the nearby airport. When Japan surrendered, claims of sovereignty over Kowloon finally came to a head between the Chinese and the British. Perhaps to avoid triggering yet another conflict in the wake of a world war, both countries wiped their hands of the burgeoning territory.

And then came the refugees, the squatters, the outlaws. The uncontrolled building of 300 interconnected towers crammed into a seven-acre plot of land had begun and by 1990, Kowloon was home to more than 50,000 inhabitants….

Despite earning its Cantonese nickname, “City of Darkness”, amazingly, many of Kowloon’s residents liked living there. And even with its lack of basic amenities such as sanitation, safety and even sunlight, it’s reported that many have fond memories of the friendly tight-knit community that was “poor but happy”.

“People who lived there were always loyal to each other. In the Walled City, the sunshine always followed the rain,” a former resident told the South China Morning Post….

Today all that remains of Kowloon is a bronze small-scale model of the labyrinth in the middle a public park where it once stood.

This isn’t to say places like Kowloon Walled City no longer exist in Hong Kong….

— from Anywhere But Here: Kowloon “Anarchy” City

(via tinyhouseamerica)


Michigan ratification may have interesting implications for constitutional law

mothernaturenetwork:

7 deserts that used to be verdant fields and forestsA lot can happen in a few thousand years. Check out these global desert hot spots that used to be lush, green environments.

mothernaturenetwork:

7 deserts that used to be verdant fields and forests
A lot can happen in a few thousand years. Check out these global desert hot spots that used to be lush, green environments.


jtotheizzoe:

#NOSPINES

I bet you thought “There’s no way that someone could make a parody of Blurred Lines that pays homage to all the world’s invertebrates!!

Well, you’re wrong.

(by Carin Bondar)


man-and-camera:



Denver ➾ Luke Gram

jtotheizzoe:

skunkbear:

A couple months ago I shared some GIFs of invisible things, and I finally got around to putting them together in this video:

When light travels through areas of different air density, it bends. You’ve probably noticed the way distant pavement seems to shimmer on a hot day, or the way stars appear to twinkle. You’re seeing light that has been distorted as it passes through varying air densities, which are in turn created by varying temperatures and pressures.

Schlieren Flow Visualization can be used to visually capture these changes in density: the rising heat from a candle, the turbulence around an airplane wing, the plume of a sneeze … even sound.  Special thanks to Mike Hargather, a professor of mechanical engineering at New Mexico Tech, who kindly provided a lot of these videos.

I’m totally Schlieren right now. Amazing sights of sounds.


arkatia:

The Season - The Dodos

(via mountingwaveofsound)

475 plays

nybg:

Weird is good, I say. And this spring, we’re going full-tilt weird (at least botanically speaking). On April 19, we’re throwing open the doors on a brand new art exhibition that embodies the stranger side of plants. Through a partnership with the American Society of Botanical ArtistsWeird, Wild, & Wonderful showcases the results of a challenge made to a global community of painters, illustrators, and more: look beyond the simple flower.

The result is both visceral and beautiful. Head through for more info on this bizarrely enticing exhibition. —MN

(Contributing artists, clockwise from top left: Ann S. Hoffenberg, Akiko Enokido, Nancy Gehrig, and Asuka Hishiki)


jtotheizzoe:

Are These Cave Paintings The First Animations?
Over at Nautilus, Zach Zorich illuminates how 21,000 year-old cave paintings at Lascaux may represent an early form of motion picture.
Many of the superimposed animal shapes, like the deer heads above (photo by Norbert Aujoulet), can appear to move like a flip-book when they are viewed with the dim, flickering light sources that would have been available to Paleolithic humans. Combine it with some low-light trickery on behalf of the visual system, and you’ve got cave-toons:

Physiologically, our eyes undergo a switch when we slip into darkness. In bright light, eyes primarily rely on the color-sensitive cells in our retinas called cones, but in low light the cones don’t have enough photons to work with and cells that sense black and white gradients, called rods, take over. That’s why in low light, colors fade, shadows become harder to distinguish from actual objects, and the soft boundaries between things disappear. Images straight ahead of us look out of focus, as if they were seen in our peripheral vision. The end result for early humans who viewed cave paintings by firelight might have been that a deer with multiple heads, for example, resembled a single, animated beast.

Storytelling, visual or otherwise, is simply part of what makes human.
Previously: Archaeologist Marc Azema has found similar story-paintings at Chauvet, even older than Lascaux!
(via Nautilus)

jtotheizzoe:

Are These Cave Paintings The First Animations?

Over at Nautilus, Zach Zorich illuminates how 21,000 year-old cave paintings at Lascaux may represent an early form of motion picture.

Many of the superimposed animal shapes, like the deer heads above (photo by Norbert Aujoulet), can appear to move like a flip-book when they are viewed with the dim, flickering light sources that would have been available to Paleolithic humans. Combine it with some low-light trickery on behalf of the visual system, and you’ve got cave-toons:

Physiologically, our eyes undergo a switch when we slip into darkness. In bright light, eyes primarily rely on the color-sensitive cells in our retinas called cones, but in low light the cones don’t have enough photons to work with and cells that sense black and white gradients, called rods, take over. That’s why in low light, colors fade, shadows become harder to distinguish from actual objects, and the soft boundaries between things disappear. Images straight ahead of us look out of focus, as if they were seen in our peripheral vision. The end result for early humans who viewed cave paintings by firelight might have been that a deer with multiple heads, for example, resembled a single, animated beast.

Storytelling, visual or otherwise, is simply part of what makes human.

Previously: Archaeologist Marc Azema has found similar story-paintings at Chauvet, even older than Lascaux!

(via Nautilus)


tinyhouseamerica:

mothernaturenetwork:

Paralysis is no longer permanent: Spinal stimulation gets patients movingWith the help of electrical stimulation therapy, patients with spinal cord injuries can regain and control movement.

We talked about this at work!!!  Fuck yeah!!!

tinyhouseamerica:

mothernaturenetwork:

Paralysis is no longer permanent: Spinal stimulation gets patients moving
With the help of electrical stimulation therapy, patients with spinal cord injuries can regain and control movement.

We talked about this at work!!! Fuck yeah!!!



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